Curatorial Note

5th December 2010 : Unbounded-by 5 young artists

An exhibition of works by artists Bamdev Mondal, Bhaskar Chowdhury, Kartick Chandra Soren, Tuhin Kundu & Rathin Barman

Material has always been significant to sculpture. Making gives it a special dimension particularly when both, material and making come in relation to motif. Therefore, material, making and motif (matter) reconcile in right proportion to form a language that transcends disciplinary boundaries. The language thus formed acquires strength of communication at various levels. The works, appearing in the form of sculptural, installation-based arrangements in this show though emerge from studio-based sculptural practices, they move towards a domain that hints at interaction, criticism, questioning. Moreover, there is an attempt to voice political thoughts in a subtle format. Only one artist in this show directly deals with a strong political language. This interplay of subtle and direct visual political register through art is stimulating to follow. It is interesting to see all these artists have looked into the possibilities of reconciling situations diverse in nature. This has brought about a surrealistic irrational juxtaposition of elements, motifs and objects.

Installation View Of The Show

Unbounded-by 5 young artists An exhibition of works by artists Bamdev Mondal, Bhaskar Chowdhury, Kartick Chandra Soren, Tuhin Kundu & Rathin Barman

Art Work In The Show

Unbounded-by 5 young artists An exhibition of works by artists Bamdev Mondal, Bhaskar Chowdhury, Kartick Chandra Soren, Tuhin Kundu & Rathin Barman Material has always been significant to sculpture. Making gives it a special dimension particularly when both, material and making come in relation to motif. Therefore, material, making and motif (matter) reconcile in right proportion to form a language that transcends disciplinary boundaries. The language thus formed acquires strength of communication at various levels. The works, appearing in the form of sculptural, installation-based arrangements in this show though emerge from studio-based sculptural practices, they move towards a domain that hints at interaction, criticism, questioning. Moreover, there is an attempt to voice political thoughts in a subtle format. Only one artist in this show directly deals with a strong political language. This interplay of subtle and direct visual political register through art is stimulating to follow. It is interesting to see all these artists have looked into the possibilities of reconciling situations diverse in nature. This has brought about a surrealistic irrational juxtaposition of elements, motifs and objects. The urinal made of cow dung, displayed in both urban and rural sites by Rathin Barman (b.1981), the teethed bag combining the organic with inanimate by Bamdeb Mondal (b.1986), plough-tools made with authentic, culture specific textiles and labeled as branded product by Bhaskar Chowdhury (b.1985), Tuhin Kundu’s (b.1981) combination of organic forms with machines are all reflective of a practice that involves meeting of irreconcilables. This deliberate shift of perspective involves an identitarian political voice. The visual register of all these artists are refined both materially and conceptually. The high finish and meticulous details reflects on a language that is layered and therefore multiple in nature. The show further acquires significance when one confronts the diametrically opposite sculptural installation by Kartik Ch. Saren (b.1985). Here the works have an irre feeling opposed to the sophisticated works of the other four artists. Like most of their practice concerning reconciliation of the diverse elements. The show literally becomes a site of reconciliation between passive and active, sophisticated and crude, urban and rural politics. It is like a dialogue between the two that one experiences while making one’s way through the sculptures and sculpture-based installations.

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